Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado by Charles F. Leaf

Cover of: Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado | Charles F. Leaf

Published by Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station] in [Fort Collins, Colo .

Written in English

Read online

Places:

  • Colorado.

Subjects:

  • Snow -- Colorado.,
  • Stream measurements -- Colorado.

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 18-19.

Book details

Statementby Charles F. Leaf.
SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper RM-66
Classifications
LC ClassificationsSD11 .A4568 no. 66, GB2425.C6 .A4568 no. 66
The Physical Object
Pagination19 p.
Number of Pages19
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5168862M
LC Control Number74612351

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Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado. [Fort Collins, Colo., Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station] (OCoLC) Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado.

[Fort Collins, Colo., Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station] (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors. Title. Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado / Related Titles.

Series: USDA Forest Service research paper RM ; 66 By. Leaf, Charles F. Type. Book. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado Item Preview remove-circle Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado by Leaf, Charles F.

Publication date Pages: Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado / Topics: Colorado, Snow, Stream measurements. Publisher: Author: Charles F.

Leaf. Download PDF Runoff From Snowmelt book full free. Runoff From Snowmelt available for download and read online in other formats.

Snow; Page: ; Areal Snow Cover and Disposition of Snowmelt Runoff in Central Colorado. The calibration and validation of this DC-snow model was found to have a high level of accuracy with global RMSE values of mm for the average snow depth and m² m⁻² for the snow cover.

Two simple theoretical models have been developed to describe the effect of forest cover on radiation transfer to a snowpacks.

Model 1, which describes the effect of varying canopy closure on the net radiation received by an interior snowpack, suggests that the net radiation may increase or decrease monotonically as the canopy closure increases from zero to %, or.

US Dept of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service Denver/Boulder, CO Broadway Boulder, CO   Snow hydrology is the study of snow contributions to the hydrologic cycle, particularly snowmelt, meltwater movement within the snowpack, and meltwater contributions to surface runoff.

The snow. Seasonal snow cover has a maximum areal extent of 9% of the earth’s surface, while glaciers cover ∼10% (15 × 10 6 km 2) of the Earth’s surface (NSIDC, ).In the Northern Hemisphere, peak snowpack extent occurs in January, north of 50° (Stewart, ).In the Southern Hemisphere, snowpack outside of Antarctica is confined to alpine regions of South.

LandSat Derived Snow Cover as an Input Variable for Snowmelt Runoff Forecasting in South Central Colorado. In: Satellite Hydrology (Fifth William T. Pecora Memorial Symposium), M. Deutsch, D. LANDSAT DERIVED SNOWCOVER AS AN INPUT VARIABLE FOR SNOWMELT RUNOFF FORECASTING IN SOUTH CENTRAL COLORADO B.A.

Shafer, Soil Conservation Service, Denver, Colorado C.F. Leaf, Consulting Hydrologist, Sterling, Colorado ABSTRACT Landsat imagery for the period was used to calculate snow covered area on six drainages in Colorado. Snow. Mountain Snowmelt Runoff North Central Colorado SNOTEL Areal snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado book as Percent of Median Peak • The north central Colorado snowpack was estimated to have fallen to 10% of the normal PEAK snowpack in the South Platte basin & 18% - 21% of the normal PEAK in the North Platte & Colorado River basins.

This compars to 33% - 37% of the PEAK a week ago. energy for snowmelt and evaporation, and turbulent heat contributed 26% dur­ ing expeditionary observations in May Average daily snow evaporation used 10% of available energy while snowmelt used 90%.

Study Region Over the past several decades conceptual models have become the standard tool for operational snowmelt runoff. Snow Melt Peak Flow Forecast Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (1) Historical Observations: Regression Analysis Runoff volume Runoff Peak Colorado Basin River Forecast Center 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Snow Precipitation Soil Moisture Temperature 10 days QTF 5 days QPF.

Much of Colorado's high country has seen above normal snow pack this year. RJ Sangosti, The Denver Post A power pole is snapped in half during a recent avalanche on Main Silverton. When Colorado has a bounty of snowpack, it always seems like good news at first.

Drought is officially over in the state, for the first time in 19 years. Farmers can maintain crops and livestock. Increased interest in snow and snowmelt runoff has resulted in the need for a better knowledge of snowfall and the water equivalent of snow cover.

Present measuring methods have proven valuable for seasonal runoff prediction and other water management requirements in major snow areas. However, more accurate estimates of the actual snowfall and the average areal snow cover.

University of Colorado Boulder, CO Peer-Reviewed Journals Liptzin D, Detlev Helmig, Stevem K. Schmidt, Brian Seok, and Mark W. Williams, Winter gas exchange between the atmosphere and snow-covered soils on Niwot Ridge, Colorado, Plant Ecology and Diversity, in. “Snowmelt—Accounting for Changes in Snow and Snowcover,” describes approaches to modeling the change of snow quantity and areal extent during snow-melt.

Chapter 9, “Statistical Analyses,” summarizes statistical techniques that are commonly used in snow hydrology. The techniques and “tools” described in Chap. RM-RP Real snow cover and disposition of snowmelt runoff in central Colorado.

RM-RP Decay of ponderosa pine sawtimber in the Black Hills. RM-RP Physical properties of alpine snow as related to weather and avalanche conditions. RM-RP Computer-assisted timber inventory analysis and management planning. The volume and timing of snowmelt runoff are affected by air temperature.

During the winter, warmer temperatures mean that less precipitation falls as snow than as rain, resulting in less snowpack. The earlier arrival of warmer temperatures in the spring causes snow to melt earlier in the year.

California Nevada River Forecast Center - Your government source of hydrologic/weather data and forecasts for California, Nevada, and portions of southern Oregon. Snow cover area (SCA) is a key component in the snowmelt-runoff model (SRM) as well as in other models that are used for simulating snowmelt runoff (Steele et al., ).

The information on snow-covered areas is therefore important for hydrological and climatological modeling (Tekeli et al., ), and this can be obtained using remote sensing.

Initial Parameter Values for the SNOW Model (pdf, kb) Corps of Engineers, Runoff from Snowmelt, EM (pdf, mb) The following report, from the Corps of Engineers North Pacific Division,may be over a half century old, but it contains considerable information about the thermodynamics of snow and the mechanics of.

«Impact of the snow cover estimation method on the Snowmelt Runoff Model performance in the moroccan High Atlas Mountains», in Hydrological Sciences Journal, 54(6), pp.

Capitanelli R., – «Climatología de Mendoza», in Boletín de Estudios geográficos, n°UNC, Mendoza, p. Research has revealed that dust accumulating on mountain snowpacks in the Upper Colorado River basin significantly reduces runoff, negatively impacting human activities in a large area.

The 1, mile-long Colorado River is the only major source of surface water in the Southwestern U.S. At least 27 million people in parts of seven U.S. states and two Mexican.

New research claims the phenomenon known as dust on snow, and not air temperatures, controls the pace of spring snowmelt in Colorado River headwaters. Snow was described in China, as early as BCE in Han Ying's book "Disconnection, which contrasted the pentagonal symmetry of flowers with the hexagonal symmetry of snow.

Albertus Magnus proved what may be the earliest detailed European description of snow in Johannes Kepler attempted to explain why snow crystals are hexagonal in his book.

The impacts of climate change on water sustainability in the Western U.S. is inherently linked to changes in mountain snow accumulation and snowmelt timing which sustains agricultural and municipal water demands for 60 million people in the region.

A potential major implication of these changes is associated with the viability of current water infrastructure; in particular, the. To evaluate how the dust impacts snowmelt, the team. used a hydrology model that has been shown to simulate Robbing.

the West Dust on snow reduces. Colorado River runoff by 5 percent. snowmelt and river flows in the Colorado Basin. The researchers modeled the rate of mountain snowmelt and volume of runoff at Lees Ferry in Arizona, the point. While the news is good so far, the Colorado River Basin will need quite a bit more snowpack to have a normal runoff year, according to Don Meyer, senior water resources engineer with the Colorado River District.

“The snowpack is currently above average, but in order to get normal or average runoff, we need additional snowpack,” Meyer said. tial water loss in terms of snowmelt runoff from forested areas (llarshbarger et al., ). The disposition of snow on a forest canopy during and after snowfall involves five'general processes that are affected by complex relationships between the tree canopy, intercepted snow and climatic parameters.

snow cover (nl) were again determined. Timothy Wayne Hawkins. Department of Geography and Earth Science Shippensburg University, Old Main Drive, Shippensburg, PA Work: ()Fax: ()[email protected]

A snowstorm can push back the beginning of snowmelt runoff, which can help counter hot, dry conditions in the summer.

The 'normal' snowfall accumulation for Denver in. precipitation input to final disposition within the water­ shed as discharge (including both surface and subsur­ face streamflow components). The model, in its original form and application, pertains to locals that typically experience a fall through winter snow- accumulation season followed by a spring snowmelt.

Mark Williams - South Continental Area Chair. Bruce McGurk – Technical Tour Chair. Al Rango – Vendor Chair. Bruce McGurk - Editor. Printed By.

Omnipress - For sale by the Western Snow Conference. Order from: Jon Lea. PO Box Brush Prairie, WA. [email protected] Cover Photos. Colorado's peak flow from snowmelt hit a few weeks earlier than normal, causing problems for some recreational users of the state's rivers and complicating downstream irrigation strategies.A dozen.

Temperature-index (TI) models are commonly used to simulate the volume and occurrence of meltwater in snow-fed catchments. TI models have varying levels of complexity but are all based on air temperature observations. The quality and availability of data that drive these models affect their predictive ability, particularly given that they are frequently applied in remote.

Winter storms have covered the Rocky Mountains with snow from Wyoming to northern New Mexico, leaving a bounty of runoff that should boost the levels of the Colorado River’s depleted reservoirs.Snow comprises individual ice crystals that grow while suspended in the atmosphere—usually within clouds—and then fall, accumulating on the ground where they undergo further changes.

It consists of frozen crystalline water throughout its life cycle, starting when, under suitable conditions, the ice crystals form in the atmosphere, increase to millimeter size, precipitate and .The volume and timing of snowmelt runoff are affected by air temperature.

During the winter, warmer temperatures mean that less precipitation falls as snow than as rain, resulting in less snowpack. The earlier arrival of warmer temperatures in the spring causes snow .

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